What I learned about Content Marketing from My Son – 8 Keys to Success

My oldest son starts his third year of studying high school Marketing this year and it has become apparent that he has learned more than I realized about content marketing strategy. Join me on a ride along and experience how this young man nailed content marketing and see how you can too!

Photo courtesy of Shena Tschofen (CC)

Photo courtesy of Shena Tschofen (CC)

I believe that businesses of any size benefit from integrating a sound content marketing strategy into their marketing plans. A well-executed content marketing strategy does not have to be expensive and it will result in sales.

To that end I developed a straightforward but robust list of 8 Content Marketing Steps. This list is not an attempt to address content marketing strategy soup to nuts. It is designed to help businesses get started.

Apparently teenagers who have just received their driver’s license can also utilize these steps to market their desire to borrow your car to go to the school dance:

  1. Know your audience and understand what matters to them.

I applaud planning and value going to bed at a reasonable hour. My son took this into account and introduced the idea of the school dance several days in advance while acknowledging that it ended later than I typically go to bed.

At this time he did not market his solution. He recognized that this was the early engagement stage and that he was simply creating awareness for the dance and his desire to attend. Maybe he’s been listening to me after all!

  1. Identify your business goals to determine your content marketing goals.

My son’s goal was to drive my car to the dance and stay until the dance ended at 11pm. To achieve this he identified that his marketing needed to create an awareness of his maturity.

Suddenly the trash miraculously disappeared on cue every time it was full. I didn’t have to ask him to clean his dishes away after dinner. I was starting to like this!

In a coincidental moment of utter despair, the vehicle in question wouldn’t start when I needed to get one of his brothers to hockey practice. Calmly he said “Pop the hood Mom” and proceeded to diagnose and fix the problem while I switched to our second vehicle. Now I was being drawn in!

  1. Jot down topics that matter to your audience and create a variety of content about them.

It also happened to be the first week back to school. We talked about grades and expectations without any eye rolling. He shared every piece of paper I had to sign. That’s a first. He even mapped out the best route for back-to-school night. I was fast becoming a subscriber!

  1. Build a simple content calendar to help you decide where, how, and how frequently you are going to publish your knowledge.

Again understanding the target audience, my son tamed his tendency to keep asking me the same questions (Can I go and can I take your car?) over and over. Also knowing I don’t like to get bombarded with requests the minute he gets home from school, he started to ask me about my day.

He was very purposeful in deciding where, when and how to discuss the dance. In the natural way of things, after talking about my day, we started to talk about his day. Over the course of several afternoon chats and a couple of texts, I learned about the dance.

He continued to resist the temptation to ask for permission to go to the dance or for the car. He provided useful information at appropriate intervals when I asked and he didn’t rush the relationship-building.

  1. Consistently publish relevant content across the customer lifecycle.

About three days before the dance, he correctly gauged that awareness and engagement had been achieved and there was definitely interest. He chose this time to reinforce that if allowed to go he understood the expectations.

No-one else could be in the car with him, no phone activity in the car, and no leaving the dance unless it’s to come home.

This was incredibly relevant at this point in the buyer’s journey. It’s often the time at which companies start to push their product too hard. He chose to continue to focus on what mattered to me.

  1. Be purposeful in your engagement tactics.

A couple of days before the dance he waited for a good time and asked very politely if he could go? It was a call to action that tested the strength of his marketing. Had I been listening? Was the information he provided relevant? Had he naturally engaged me to this point?

Asking for an indication of intent was the next logical step. He closed the sale with a great offer. He had his own money saved and was planning to pay for himself…sold!

I smiled and said “Sounds great! Would you like to borrow the car?”

  1. Measure, monitor, and analyze everything. Your SEO, your channels, your offers, your social media metrics, etc.   Adjust accordingly.

The day of the dance he went back over the plan. Leave the house at this time. Pick up glow sticks for the dance from this store. Drive to the school to arrive at this time. Be home no later than this time.

He gave me everything I needed to measure success. I said I’d keep my phone handy so that we could make any adjustments if needed.

  1. Make it easy for your audience to move between learning from you and buying from you.

Not only did he make it easy for me to buy from him, he also integrated the last two stages of the customer lifecycle; retention and advocacy. He didn’t drop his target audience like a hot potato the minute he had what he wanted.

Instead he arrived home ten minutes early. Now he has built trust and I am his advocate. We both know this will help him the next time he wants to borrow the car. I am far more likely to buy from him again. Of course it would be nice if he keeps taking out the trash too!

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